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Relations, Sex and Health Education

We believe this policy should be a working document that is fit for purpose, represents the school ethos, enables consistency and quality across the school and is related to the following legislation:

  • Education Act 1996

  • Education Act 2002

  • Equality Act 2010

  • Education Act 2011

  • Children and Social Act 2017

 

The following documentation is also related to this policy:

  • Equality Act 2010: Advice for Schools (DfE)

  • Keeping Children Safe in Education: Statutory Guidance for Schools and Colleges (DfE 2018)

  • Special Educational Needs and Disability Code of Practice: 0 to 25 Years. Statutory Guidance for Organisations Who Work With and Support Children and Young People with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (DfE) and (DoH)

  • Behaviour and Discipline in Schools (DfE 2016)

  • Alternative Provision: Statutory Guidance (DfE 2013)

  • Mental Health and Behaviour in Schools (DfE 2018)

  • Preventing and Tackling Bullying (DfE 2017)

  • Sexual Violence and Sexual Harassment between Children in Schools (DfE 2018)

  • Promoting Fundamental British Values as part of SMSC in Schools (DfE 2014)

  • National Citizen Service Guidance for Schools (DfE 2017)

  • Parental Engagement on Relationships Education (DfE 2019)

  • Race Disparity Audit - Summary Findings from the Ethnicity Facts and Figures Website (Cabinet Office)

 

We are aware that as from September 2020 Relationships Education must be taught by all primary schools in England and that Health Education will also be compulsory. In both subjects parents will not be able to request for their children to be withdrawn. 

 

We believe that after consultation with parents that this policy meets the needs of pupils and reflects the local community. Parents were made aware that they do not have the right to veto on any part of the curriculum but they do have a role to play in the process of reviewing this policy.

 

We are aware that in the development of Relationships Education our main focus is ‘on teaching the fundamental building blocks and characteristics of positive relationships, with reference to friendships, family relationships and relationships with other children and with adults.’

 

Relationships Education has the following five areas of study that should be covered by the end of primary school and includes detail on what pupils should know:

  • Families and people who care for me

  • Caring friendships

  • Respectful relationships

  • Online relationships

  • Being safe

 

We work hard to ensure that pupils are taught the importance of equality and respect and that all teaching is sensitive and age appropriate. Therefore, at the appropriate time we will teach pupils about LGBT issues not as stand-alone lessons but being fully integrated into their programmes of study.

 

We acknowledge that Sex Education is not compulsory in primary schools. However, we do have in place ‘a sex education programme that is tailored to the age and the physical and emotional maturity of the pupils’ we teach. 

 

However, parents have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from sex education beyond the national curriculum for science. We ensure that when a child is withdrawn then alternative arrangements will be made for that child.

 

For teachers we provide training on how to handle those difficult questions about sex and sexuality that pupils might ask and which go beyond what is set out within Relationships Education. 

 

We carry out the main sex education teaching in our Health and Wellbeing curriculum. We also teach some sex education through other subject areas (for example, science and PE), where we feel that they contribute significantly to a child’s knowledge and understanding of his or her own body, and how it is changing and developing.

 

The organisation and management of our sex education programme is undertaken by subject coordinators and class teachers. The planning and delivery of the programme is undertaken by the Curriculum Leader and subject coordinators. The delivery of this programme will be flexible and it will be delivered through topics, planned aspects of science, class discussions, circle time, assemblies, and the occasional visit from the school nurse.

 

We ensure that all school personnel are trained to manage disclosures of any type and pupils are made aware of how to raise concerns, to make a report and how a report will be handled.

 

We ensure that we teach the characteristics of good physical health and mental wellbeing. We realise that ‘mental wellbeing is a normal part of daily life, in the same way as physical health.’ 

 

Physical health and mental wellbeing have the following eight areas of study that should be covered by the end of primary school and includes detail on what pupils should know:

  • Mental well-being

  • Internet safety

  • Physical health and fitness

  • Healthy eating

  • Drugs, alcohol and tobacco

  • Health and prevention

  • Basic first aid

  • The changing adolescent body

 

We consider Relationships Education, Sex Education and Health Education complement the National Curriculum subjects of Citizenship, Science, Computing and Physical Education. In our planning we look for ‘opportunities to draw links between the subjects and integrate teaching where appropriate.’

 

We ensure Relationships Education, Sex Education and Health Education are accessible to all pupils and we believe our flexible differentiated curriculum planning caters for pupils with SEND.

We have high expectations of our pupils and we set appropriate challenging targets. All teaching is assessed and assessments are used to identify those pupils who need extra support or intervention.

 

We are aware that when we are inspected all aspects of Relationships Education, Sex Education and Health Education will be assessed through consideration of pupils personal development, pupils behaviour, pupils welfare or through their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.

 

We wish to work closely with the Pupil Voice Groups and to hear their views and opinions as we acknowledge and support Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child that children should be encouraged to form and to express their views.

 

We as a school community have a commitment to promote equality. Therefore, an equality impact assessment has been undertaken and we believe this policy is in line with the Equality Act 2010.

 

We all have a responsibility to ensure equality permeates in to all aspects of school life and that everyone is treated equally irrespective of age, disability, gender reassignment, marriage and civil partnership, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sex and sexual orientation. We want everyone connected with this school to feel safe, secure, valued and of equal worth.

 

We acknowledge the findings of the Race Disparity Audit that clearly shows how people of different ethnicities are treated across the public services of health, education, employment and the criminal justice system. 

 

The educational section of the audit that covers: differences by region; attainment and economic disadvantage; exclusions and abuse; and destinations, has a significant importance for the strategic planning of this school.

 

We believe it is essential that this policy clearly identifies and outlines the roles and responsibilities of all those involved in the procedures and arrangements that is connected with this policy.

 

Aims

  • To ensure compliance with all relevant legislation connected to this policy and that Relationships Education and Health Education are taught as from 2020.
  • To consult with parents that this policy meets the needs of pupils and reflects the local community. 

  • To ensure pupils are taught the importance of equality and respect and that all teaching is sensitive and age appropriate.

  • To ensure parents are aware that they have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from sex education beyond the national curriculum for science.

  • To share good practice within the school and with other schools. 

  • To work with other schools and the local authority to share good practice in order to improve this policy.

 

Role of the Governing Body

The Governing Body has:

  • appointed a member of staff to be responsible for Relationships Education;

  • appointed a member of staff to be responsible for Health and Wellbeing;

  • delegated powers and responsibilities to the Headteacher to ensure all school personnel and stakeholders are aware of and comply with this policy;

  • responsibility for ensuring:

    • full compliance with all statutory responsibilities;

    • the school complies with all equalities legislation;

    • funding is in place to support this policy;

    • this policy and all policies are maintained and updated regularly;

    • all policies are made available to parents;

    • the nomination of a designated Equalities governor to ensure that appropriate action will be taken to deal with all prejudice related incidents or incidents which are a breach of this policy; 

    • all pupils make progress in achieving the expected educational outcomes;

    • the subjects are well led, effectively managed and well planned;

    • the quality of provision is subject to regular and effective self-evaluation;

    • the teaching is delivered in ways accessible to all pupils with SEND;

    • clear information is provided for parents on the subject content and the right to request that their child is withdrawn;

    • the subjects are resourced, staffed and timetabled in a way that ensures that the school can fulfil its legal obligations;

    • the involvement of Pupil Voice Groups in: 

      • determining this policy with the Governing Body;

      • discussing improvements to this policy during the school year;

      • organising surveys to gauge the thoughts of all pupils;

      • reviewing the effectiveness of this policy with the Governing Body

 

  • the nomination of a link governor to:
    • visit the school regularly; 
    • work closely with the Headteacher and the Health and Wellbeing Leader;
    • ensure this policy and other linked policies are up to date;
    • ensure that everyone connected with the school is aware of this policy;
    • attend training related to this policy;
    • annually report to the Governing Body on the success and development of this policy.
  • the celebration of the effort, success and achievements of pupils and school personnel;

  • the effective implementation, monitoring and evaluation of this policy

 

Role of the Headteacher 

The Headteacher will:

  • place a high priority on Relationships Education, Sex Education and Health Education;

  • ensure that these subjects are set in the ‘context of a wider whole-school approach to supporting pupils to be safe, happy and prepared for life beyond school;

  • consider how teaching in the school ‘support the development of important attributes in pupils such as honesty, kindness, tolerance, courtesy, resilience and self-efficacy;

  • ‘automatically grant a request to withdraw a pupil from any sex education other than as part of the science curriculum;

  • provide appropriate, purposeful education for any pupil who has been excused from sex education;

  • work in conjunction with the Senior Leadership Team to ensure all school personnel, pupils and parents are aware of and comply with this policy;

  • ensure risk assessments are:

    • in place and cover all aspects of this policy;

    • accurate and suitable;

    • reviewed annually;

    • easily available for all school personnel

 

  • create an ethos that is based on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child where pupils understand the importance of equality and respect the rights of others;

  • endorse a curriculum that teaches children to know about their rights and to have positive attitudes to respecting the rights of others;

  • use whole school assemblies well to promote the school ethos;

  • work closely with the Pupil Voice Groups and to hear their views and opinions;

  • encourage pupils to form and to express their views;

  • work closely with the link governor and coordinator;

  • provide leadership and vision in respect of equality;

  • make effective use of relevant research and information to improve this policy;

  • organise effective training for the teaching staff so that they can handle any difficult issues with sensitivity

  • monitor the effectiveness of this policy by: 

    • monitoring learning and teaching through observing lessons

    • monitoring planning and assessment

    • speaking with pupils, school personnel, parents and governors

 

  • annually report to the Governing Body on the success and development of this policy.

 

Role of the Health and Wellbeing Leader

The Leader will:

  • develop a differentiated curriculum;

  • work closely with all Area of Learning Leaders to ensure all pupils experiences are appropriate, progressive, non duplicated and has a positive impact on the curriculum;

  • work with external organisations in order to enhance delivery of these subjects by introducing specialist knowledge and different ways of engaging with pupils;

  • ensure that the teaching delivered by a specialist teacher fits with the planned programme;

  • provide strategic leadership and direction;

  • provide a curriculum that provides pupils with the essential knowledge they need to be educated citizens in democratic Britain;

  • coordinate a number of working parties in order to explore ways of improving the curriculum and the way in which we deliver it with a view of ensuring the highest standards of delivery and consistency in pupil’s learning and teaching experiences and opportunities throughout the school;

  • provide an environment that is fun, stimulating and challenging to all pupils;

  • promote an awareness of and respect for a diversity of cultures, values, beliefs and abilities;

  • equip children with a range of skills and a desire for lifelong learning;

  • ensure appropriate coverage of the curriculum;

  • provide support and advice;

  • monitor pupil progress;

  • ensure sufficient and up to date resources are in place

 

Role of the Coordinators

  • lead the development of this policy throughout the school;

  • work closely with the Headteacher and the Leader to discuss with parents:

    • the planning and delivery of these subjects;

    • any concerns they may have;

    • how to manage conversations with their children on a variety of related issues;

    • they have the right to request that their child be withdrawn from any sex education other than as part of the science curriculum

 

  • provide guidance and support to all staff;

  • provide training for all staff on induction and when the need arises regarding;

  • make effective use of relevant research and information to improve this policy;

  • keep up to date with new developments and resources;

  • undertake risk assessments when required;

  • review and monitor;

  • annually report to the Governing Body on the success and development of this policy

 

Role of School Personnel

  • comply with all aspects of this policy;

  • produce differentiated curriculum planning; 

  • have high expectations of their pupils and set appropriate challenge within lessons;

  • assess their teaching and use assessments to identify pupils who need extra support or intervention;

  • be trained to deal with sensitive issues;

  • know how to manage disclosures of any type;

  • know how to maintain an appropriate level of confidentiality;

  • be aware of all other linked policies;

  • maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour within and outside school and not to undermine fundamental British and Welsh values;

  • work in partnership parents and carers keeping them up to date with their child's progress and behaviour at school;

  • implement the school’s equalities policy and schemes;

  • report and deal with all incidents of discrimination;

  • attend appropriate training sessions on equality;

  • report any concerns they have on any aspect of the school community

 

Role of the Designated Safeguarding Lead

  • ensure all school personnel are trained to manage disclosures of any type;

  • ensure pupils are made aware of how to raise concerns, to make a report and how a report will be handled;

  • ensure school personnel are trained to deal with sensitive issues;

  • be made aware of the proposed content of lessons that are safeguarding related as he/she might have local knowledge that could be of value;

 

Role of Pupils

  • be aware of and comply with this policy;

  • know how to raise a concern or make a report and know how any report will be handled whether it is about them or a friend or peer;

  • treating others, their work and equipment with respect;

  • supporting the school Code of Conduct and guidance necessary to ensure the smooth running of the school;

  • liaising with the Pupil Voice Groups;

  • taking part in questionnaires and surveys

 

Role of Parents/Carers

  • be aware of and comply with this policy;

  • be made aware of the following questions and answers as compiled by the DfE:

 

Q: Will my child’s school have to engage with me before teaching these subjects?

A: Schools will be required to consult with parents when developing and reviewing their policies for Relationships Education and RSE, which will inform schools’ decisions on when and how certain content is covered. Effective engagement gives the space and time for parents to input, ask questions, share concerns and for the school to decide the way forward. Schools will listen to parents’ views, and then make a reasonable decision as to how they wish to proceed. When and how content is taught is ultimately a decision for the school, and consultation does not provide a parental veto on curriculum content.

A school’s policies for these subjects must be published online, and must be available to any individual free of charge. Schools should also ensure that, when they engage parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use, for example the books they will use in lessons.

 

Q: Will my child be taught sex education at primary? This is too young.

A: We are not introducing compulsory sex education at primary school.

We are introducing Relationships Education at primary, to put in place the building blocks needed for positive and safe relationships of all kinds. This will start with family and friends, how to treat each other with kindness, and recognising the difference between online and offline friendships.

Many primary schools choose to teach sex education (which goes beyond the existing national curriculum for science), and we recommend that they do so, tailored to the age, physical and emotional maturity of their pupils. In those instances we recommend you discuss this with the school, to understand what they propose to teach and how. If you continue to have concerns, you have an automatic right to withdraw your child from these sex education lessons.

 

Q: Does the new Relationships Education and RSE curriculum take account of my faith?

A: The subjects are designed to help children from all backgrounds build positive and safe relationships, and to thrive in modern Britain.

In all schools, when teaching these subjects, the religious background of pupils must be taken into account when planning teaching, so that topics are appropriately handled. Schools with a religious character can build on the core required content by reflecting their beliefs in their teaching.

In developing these subjects, we have worked with a number of representative bodies and faith organisations, representing all the major faith groups in England. Several faith organisations produce teaching materials that schools can choose to use.

 

Q: Do I have a right to withdraw my child from Relationships and Sex Education?

A: Parents will continue to have a right to request to withdraw their child from sex education delivered as part of RSE in secondary schools which, unless there are exceptional circumstances, should be granted up to three terms before their child turns 16. At this point, if the child themselves wishes to receive sex education rather than be withdrawn, the school should make arrangements for this to happen in one of the three terms before the child turns 16 - the legal age of sexual consent.

There is no right to withdraw from Relationships Education at primary or secondary as we believe the contents of these subjects – such as family, friendship, safety (including online safety) – are important for all children to be taught.

 

Q: Has the government listened to the views of my community in introducing these subjects?

A: A thorough engagement process, involving a public call for evidence and discussions with over 90 organisations, as well as the public consultation on the draft regulations and guidance, has informed the key decisions on these subjects. The consultation received over 11,000 responses from teachers, schools, expert organisations, young people and parents – these responses have helped finalise the statutory guidance.

 

Q: Will my child be taught about LGBT relationships?

A: Pupils should be taught about the society in which they are growing up. These subjects are designed to foster respect for others and for difference, and educate pupils about healthy relationships.

Pupils should receive teaching on LGBT content during their school years. Teaching children about the society that we live in and the different types of loving, healthy relationships that exist can be done in a way that respects everyone. Primary schools are strongly encouraged and enabled to cover LGBT content when teaching about different types of families.

Secondary schools should cover LGBT content in their RSE teaching. RSE should meet the needs of all pupils, whatever their developing sexuality or identity – this should include age-appropriate teaching about different types of relationships in the context of the law.

 

Q: What support will schools receive to deliver these subjects well?

A: We are investing in a central support package to help teachers introduce these subjects well and with confidence. This will include a new online service, featuring access to high quality resources, innovative training materials, case studies and an implementation guide, available from Spring 2020.

There will also be training available for teachers through existing regional networks, offering opportunities to improve subject knowledge and build confidence.

We’re working with expert organisations, schools and teachers to develop this support.

 

Q: Where can I find out more information about what will be taught in my child’s school?

A: If you want to know more about what will be taught as part of the new subjects, the best thing to do is speak to your child’s school. We have also published parent guides, which explain what the subjects are, and parents’ rights.

These subjects are designed to equip your child with knowledge to make informed decisions about their wellbeing, health and relationships as well as preparing them for a successful adult life. The important lessons you teach your child about healthy relationships, looking after themselves and staying safe, are respected and valued under this new curriculum.

Teaching at school will complement and reinforce the lessons you teach your child as they grow up. Your child’s school will have flexibility to deliver the content in a way that is age and developmentally appropriate and sensitive to the needs and religious background of its pupils.

  •  work in partnership with the school;

  •  comply with this policy for the benefit of their children;

  • be asked to take part periodic surveys conducted by the school;

  • support the school Code of Conduct and guidance necessary to ensure smooth running of the school

 

Training

All school personnel:

  • have equal chances of training, career development and promotion;

  • receive training on induction which specifically covers:

    • All aspects of this policy

    • Pupil behaviour and Discipline

    • Inclusion

    • Equality and Diversity

    • Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural

    • Parent Involvement (Engagement)

    • Safeguarding

    • Anti-bullying

    • Equal opportunities

    • Inclusion

 

  • receive periodic training so that they are kept up to date with new information;

  • receive equal opportunities training on induction in order to improve their understanding of the Equality Act 2010 and its implications

 

Equality Impact Assessment

Under the Equality Act 2010 we have a duty not to discriminate against people on the basis of their age, disability, gender, gender identity, pregnancy or maternity, race, religion or belief and sexual orientation.

 

This policy has been equality impact assessed and we believe that it is in line with the Equality Act 2010 as it is fair, it does not prioritise or disadvantage any pupil and it helps to promote equality at this school. 

 

This policy will be reviewed when required.

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